Three hacks to help your brain learn stuff faster.

Three hacks to help your brain learn stuff faster.

  • Tap into the spacing effect. Skill-acquisition isn’t an event, it’s a process. …
  • Train your basal ganglia. Most of us focus on comprehension when we’re attempting to improve a skill. …
  • Stop trying to stretch your attention span. …
  • 6 teens designed this wacky green building of the future..

    TAP INTO THE SPACING EFFECT.

    Skill-acquisition isn’t an event, it’s a process. If you truly want to master a new skill, it’s far better to invest small amounts of time over an extended period than a large amount of time all at once. This is what researchers call the “spacing effect,” which refers to the finding that skill-development tends to improve when learning is spaced out over time.

    You’re probably thinking, “But wait, wouldn’t this take longer?” Not necessarily. Because the spacing effect has been shown to boost retention, spreading out your learning process over a period of time limits the likelihood that you’ll have to go back to brush up (or start over completely) a week or a month or a year later. Since the late 19th century, psychologists (and anyone who’s ever crammed for an exam) have known that one of the biggest hindrances to learning is forgetting. So, counterintuitive as it may sound, being a little more patient in the short term may help you reduce your overall time spent learning in the long-run.

    Most of us focus on comprehension when we’re attempting to improve a skill. That may seem sensible enough, but science shown that while understanding is vital to heightening proficiency (it’s hard to improve when you don’t know how), it isn’t enough to obtain mastery. Turning any newly acquired knowledge into an actual skill requires engaging a part of your brain that heavily impacts learning and movement, known as the “basal ganglia.”

    TEACH SOMEONE ELSE (OR JUST PRETEND TO)

    If you imagine that you’ll need to teach someone else the material or task you are trying to grasp, you can speed up your learning and remember more, according to a studydone at Washington University in St. Louis. The expectation changes your mind-set so that you engage in more effective approaches to learning than those who simply learn to pass a test, according to John Nestojko, a postdoctoral researcher in psychology and coauthor of the study.

Ramanujan got only 57% in Mathematics in his first examination of the arts(FA exam). He is still a genius in mathematics. How is this possible?

Srinivasa Ramanujan, (born December 22, 1887, Erode, India—died April 26, 1920, Kumbakonam), Indian mathematician whose contributions to the theory of numbers include pioneering discoveries of the properties of the partition function.


When he was 15 years old, he obtained a copy of George Shoobridge Carr’s Synopsis of Elementary Results in Pure and Applied Mathematics, 2 vol. (1880–86). This collection of thousands of theorems, many presented with only the briefest of proofs and with no material newer than 1860, aroused his genius. Having verified the results in Carr’s book, Ramanujan went beyond it, developing his own theorems and ideas. In 1903 he secured a scholarship to the University of Madras but lost it the following year because he neglected all other studies in pursuit of mathematics.

If Ramanujan failed a Math testEducation and Exams are about the box., it means the test failed itself. It speaks more about the failure of the system than about the capabilities of the person.

System Design

I have always scored in the top 2/3 ranks in the class and usually 100/100 in math. Precisely because I was no math genius. If the test is designed for identifying who is the best average person, then the best will be the average. Our education system is primarily designed for addressing the problems of the middle of the bell curve. Because, this group represents the biggest chunk of the population and the outcomes are always measured in the averages [the average pass rate is 90% or the average proficiency of a student was x].

Since the system is neither designed for the game changers nor for the people with genuine learning disabilities, they will both be given worst of the hardships. The worst part is that the system cannot identify the difference between the game changers and the people needing more help learning. It confuses the two and makes things worse for the game changers.

Identifying a Genius

It is not easy for non-geniuses to identify a genius. Professor Hardy was a genius and he thus was able to identify Ramanujan’s genius. Ramanujan was lucky here. 1000s of Ramanujans might languish with morons who have no sense of what a genius looks like. Our system is unfortunately populated by poor quality teachers recruited from the bottom of the barrel. They are often intolerant and incapable of having the patience to see the ingenuity.
Although I despise reality television, I can still see some value in shows like “America has got talent” and all its regional variations. We are often stunned by the talent in the unknown, ordinary people. Think of how many such researchers or inventors are hiding behind the veil of mediocrity.

Education and Exams are about the box.

Education and Exams are about the box

Schools and colleges have a purpose. Historically, they educated students for the workforce. The system has little capability of going far beyond that. Thus, if a student doesn’t perform in those exams, it might just mean that he doesn’t fit inside the box. Thomas Edison didn’t. Steve Jobs didn’t. Henry Ford didn’t. and Ramanujan didn’t. Of course, if you are testing these smart minds on how well they will fit in a box and the potential to work in some office, of course they will fail. Because, they are not born to work in an office.

Some tips for government to get better:

  1. Consciously look for geniuses. When you are really looking to identify these genius inventors, you might have better chance.
  2. Once you identify, put them on a separate track. Don’t get them lost in the din of mediocrity. Let them be challenged by their genius peers instead of feeling smug or lost when they are the only genius around.

Thanks and regards .

Shivam tiwari

Tips to improve memory.

HOW TO FOCUS BETTER, BOOST CONCENTRATION & AVOID DISTRACTIONS.

Effective study.can only be achieved if you’re able to focus your complete attention on what you are trying to learn. If you are unable to concentrate fully on what you are doing because you’re constantly being distracted, or your thoughts are going elsewhere, your process of learning will be interrupted.
Concentration is the ability to focus all attention on the activity at hand and block out all other unnecessary thoughts and distractions. Taking your mind off all other things and completely focusing on the task at hand. According to researchers at the University of California Irvine, it takes an average of 23 minutes and 15 seconds to get back to the task following a distraction.


By the time you’ve finished this guide you’ll know exactly what to do to focus better, boost concentration and avoid distractions. You can use the quick links below to jump to a particular area of interested.

  1. Give your brain a workout
  2. Don’t skip the physical exercise
  3. Get your Zs
  4. Make time for friends
  5. Keep stress in check
  6. Have a laugh
  7. Eat a brain-boosting diet
  8. Identify and treat health problems
  9. Take practical steps to support learning and memory.

Tip 1: Give your brain a workout.

By the time you’ve reached adulthood, your brain has developed millions of neural pathways that help you process and recall information quickly, solve familiar problems, and execute familiar tasks with a minimum of mental effort. But if you always stick to these well-worn paths, you aren’t giving your brain the stimulation it needs to keep growing and developing. You have to shake things up from time to time!

Memory, like muscular strength, requires you to “use it or lose it.” The more you work out your brain, the better you’ll be able to process and remember information. But not all activities are equal. The best brain exercises break your routine and challenge you to use and develop new brain pathways.

  1. It teaches you something new. No matter how intellectually demanding the activity, if it’s something you’re already good at, it’s not a good brain exercise. The activity needs to be something that’s unfamiliar and out of your comfort zone. To strengthen the brain, you need to keep learning and developing new skills.
  2. It’s challenging. The best brain-boosting activities demand your full and close attention. It’s not enough that you found the activity challenging at one point. It must still be something that requires mental effort. For example, learning to play a challenging new piece of music counts. Playing a difficult piece you’ve already memorized does not.
  3. It’s a skill you can build on. Look for activities that allow you to start at an easy level and work your way up as your skills improve —always pushing the envelope so you continue to stretch your capabilities. When a previously difficult level starts to feel comfortable, that means it’s time to tackle the next level of performance.
  1. It’s rewarding. Rewards support the brain’s learning process. The more interested and engaged you are in the activity, the more likely you’ll be to continue doing it and the greater the benefits you’ll experience. So choose activities that, while challenging, are still enjoyable and satisfying.

Think of something new you’ve always wanted to try, like learning how to play the guitar, make pottery, juggle, play chess, speak French, dance the tango, or master your golf swing. Any of these activities can help you improve your memory, so long as they keep you challenged and engaged.

  • Aerobic exercise is particularly good for the brain, so choose activities that keep your blood pumping. In general, anything that is good for your heart is great for your brain.
  • Does it take you long time to clear out the sleep fog when you wake up? If so, you may find that exercising in the morning before you start your day makes a big difference. In addition to clearing out the cobwebs, it also primes you for learning throughout the day.
  • Physical activities that require hand-eye coordination or complex motor skills are particularly beneficial for brain building.
  • Exercise breaks can help you get past mental fatigue and afternoon slumps. Even a short walk or a few jumping jacks can be enough to reboot your brain.

Thanks and regards.

Shivam Tiwari.

JEE main 2019 preparation tips.

If you want to crack JEE Main 2019 with good marks then start your preparation today by following the below given tips-.

Some Important Topics of Syllabus.

Create Short Notes– While studying for the entrance test, clear your basic concepts and make short notes so that you can revise the important facts and figures at any place and time.

Don’t Skip any topic– Sometimes, students leave a few important topics because of their less weightage in board examination. This practice will hamper your JEE Main preparation. Hence, to crack JEE Main 2019 with good marks study every topics and chapter.

Preparing for the JEE Main exam will be one of the most rewarding things for your career and days to come. Having strong basics in Physics, Maths and Chemistry can really open up a lot of avenues for you in the future.

More than preparing for JEE Main 2018 exam, think about these 2 years (or 1 year?) as your foundation stone towards a brighter future in terms of better grades during your Engineering College, Interviews for high paying jobs, Higher Studies – the list is endless.

Time Management

Even before I go into tell you about how you should prepare yourself for the Maths, Physics or Chemistry, you need to pay attention to this – Without time management no magic is going to help you reach your goals, which is All India Rank 1!

Follow the schedule and make a plan.

Remember, I told you about making a habit in the last point. Right from tomorrow, when you get from bed, make it an habit to spend 15 – 30 minutes to plan your day.

Planning your day will set the fact in your brain that you have X number of tasks to complete and thereby you will waste much less time. See, how time management and planning your day are so related!

Here is how you can plan your day in 7 easy steps:

2.1. First, get a calendar, a dairy and a pen – to make a planner to routine up your time. You could also use mobile apps like Wunderlist or Any.DO

Know the syllabus and the exam pattern well (including weightage)

The JEE Main and Advanced Syllabus is vast and in order to get a very good rank you must make sure that you go through all the 3 subjects and have almost equal command over all of them.

You should study all the important topics first and then solve ample problems in order to gain mastery over them. Certain topics in the JEE Main & Advanced syllabus has more weightage over others, so laying more stress on these important topics will help you score more marks in the actual exam and thus fetching you a top rank!

The tough topics obviously have more weightage so without any concession you ought to study them properly. Also, this would let you divide your time well in advance among the various subjects.

Before you start your preparation you must go though the List of most important topics in JEE Main & Advanced. Apart from these you should also study the Expected chapter weightage in the JEE Main syllabus which can be found here.

Coaching Classes – Online or Offline?

Coaching classes are a crucial part of your JEE Preparation. Be it Main or Advanced, having crystal clear concepts will always help you in scoring high and getting that extra edge over others in the exam.

Back in the day when I was preparing for IIT JEE, I and other JEE aspirants all across India had access to only physical coaching centers. It used to be the best option to prepare for JEE exams back then. But now you have access to study materials and lectures right at your finger tips, thanks to the online revolution in India.

According to some stats, 45 – 50% students are now opting for Online Coaching classes as compared to the physical media such as coaching classes and study centers.

Let us quickly go over the pros and cons of both these types of coaching classes.

Study concepts, solve problems, look at solutions

No matter how many coaching classes you join or how many more study materials / books you buy, you have to spend time studying these materials and lecture notes.

Self-study is one of the most important aspects of your JEE Main & Advanced preparation. Here are some quick tips on how to study more hours daily without getting tired.

The more time you devote towards clearing your concepts in various topics of Physics, Chemistry and Maths – the better are your chances of getting a top rank in the JEE.

Best books for JEE 2019 preparation.

Books recommendation for JEE( main + Advanced ) Preparation.

Best Books to Prepare for JEE Main 2019- Every year, CBSE conducts IIT JEE Examination in the month of April to shortlist eligible candidates for UG engineering courses offered by elite Institutes including IITs, NITs, GFTIs and more. JEE Main 2019 will be conducted in online and offline mode to test the knowledge of aspirants. The questions in JEE Main and JEE advanced will be asked from Physics, Chemistry & Mathematics.

Lakhs of candidates appear for JEE Main Examination with a dream to get admission in IITs but only a few of them will be able to crack the exam with good marks.

You may think, why this difference? What’s the difference between the toppers and losers?

Dedication and right approach is the key to qualify JEE Main and JEE Advanced.


Students keep pondering on what and how to study so that they can get high scores. Hence, to assist the aspirants, we have listed 12 Best Books for JEE Main preparation. Refer these study material and start studying from the very instance-

12 Best Books to Prepare for JEE Main 2019

Reference Books for Physics1Concepts of Physics Part 1nd 2 by H.C. VermaHC Verma2Problems In GENERAL PHYSICSI.E. Irodov3Science For Everyone : Aptitude Test Problem In PhysicsS.S. KrotovReference Books for Chemistry4Organic ChemistryMorrison Boyd5Inorganic Chemistry for JEE(Main & Advanced)O.P. Tandon6Concise Inorganic Chemistry for JEE (Main & Advanced)J.D. Lee7Numerical Chemistry for JEE(Main & Advanced)P.BahadurReference Books for Mathematics8Golden Differential CalculusN.P Bali9Problems Plus in IIT MathematicsA Das Gupta10Class XI and XII MathematicsR.D. Sharma11Higher AlgebraHall and Knight12Trigonometry, Geometry BooksS.L. Loney.

‘Any simpler, and students will get 100%. JEE is designed to reject, not select… Need more institutes’ .

Ritika Chopra: How will the Institution of Eminence (IoE) status help IIT-Delhi?

IIT-Delhi Director V Ramgopal Rao talks about the problems in breaking into top 100 in world rankings, why students are not doing PhD, the need for industry to pitch in for research, the ‘fragmented education system’, and how race for board marks and grind of coaching institutes are affecting the kind of students they get.

We are quite excited that we have been considered for IoE; only two IITs have been considered. We have received an email from the secretary concerned on our fund requirements in the first year and what we want to accomplish with it. We are supposed to get Rs 200 crore every year for the next five years. We are preparing the budget for the first year.

Ritika Chopra: What did IIT-Delhi propose in terms of infrastructure and courses in the application?.

Organisations such as QS Ranking mark institutions on five parameters. One is international students. We have a few international students but that doesn’t give us any points. We got zero in terms of international faculty. As the government has been giving us funds, we had no motivation to earn from student fees, which makes 5 per cent of our total budget. Unlike American universities, our intention was not to admit more students and earn money… Therefore, we never needed international students. The government never gave us the freedom, so we were never able to recruit foreign faculty. About a year ago, when the faculty situation became severe, we started five- year contract positions.

The third parameter was faculty-to- student ratio. We are not able to recruit enough faculty because we don’t get quality applications. In IIT, many of the faculty we recruit are people who have studied in the institution, gone to the US to complete their PhD, and then joined us. But in the last five-seven years, IIT students are not going abroad for higher education. Last year, only 5 per cent of our students did so. Our faculty pool is fast drying.
Therefore, on three parameters we get zero.

‘Any simpler, and students will get 100%. JEE is designed to reject, not select… Need more institutes’

IIT-Delhi Director V Ramgopal Rao talks about the problems in breaking into top 100 in world rankings, why students are not doing PhD, the need for industry to pitch in for research, the ‘fragmented education system’, and how race for board marks and grind of coaching institutes are affecting the kind of students they get.

Ritika Chopra: How will the Institution of Eminence (IoE) status help IIT-Delhi?

We are quite excited that we have been considered for IoE; only two IITs have been considered. We have received an email from the secretary concerned on our fund requirements in the first year and what we want to accomplish with it. We are supposed to get Rs 200 crore every year for the next five years. We are preparing the budget for the first year.

Ritika Chopra: What did IIT-Delhi propose in terms of infrastructure and courses in the application?

Organisations such as QS Ranking mark institutions on five parameters. One is international students. We have a few international students but that doesn’t give us any points. We got zero in terms of international faculty. As the government has been giving us funds, we had no motivation to earn from student fees, which makes 5 per cent of our total budget. Unlike American universities, our intention was not to admit more students and earn money… Therefore, we never needed international students. The government never gave us the freedom, so we were never able to recruit foreign faculty. About a year ago, when the faculty situation became severe, we started five- year contract positions.

The third parameter was faculty-to- student ratio. We are not able to recruit enough faculty because we don’t get quality applications. In IIT, many of the faculty we recruit are people who have studied in the institution, gone to the US to complete their PhD, and then joined us. But in the last five-seven years, IIT students are not going abroad for higher education. Last year, only 5 per cent of our students did so. Our faculty pool is fast drying.
Therefore, on three parameters we get zero.

Two parameters for which we get some marks are research output and institution perception. For research output, IIT-D gets about 90 out of 100 marks. When it comes to research, we are ranked 39th in the world and are better than many American universities. Nobody thinks of India in terms of technology. So in terms of perception, we score 45 out of 100 marks.

So when we put all that together, we are ranked 172nd in the world right now. With IoE, the main goal is to enter the top 100. We need to start scoring in those parameters where we are getting zero. We have no choice but to admit foreign students. Our exams have become so tough now that I don’t think foreign students can qualify. To crack the entrance examination you need to cut yourself off for three years and prepare. The joint entrance examination (JEE) is being conducted in five other countries. Last year, we had a South Korean student. But that is because the student’s parents are in India. This year we don’t have any foreign student… At the BTech level, I don’t think we can change anything. But at the PhD level we can open up our programmes because there is more flexibility. Currently, IIT-Delhi has about 2,500 PhD students and we will increase that to 5,000….
Getting foreign faculty is difficult. Getting somebody from a top US school for the salary we offer will be tough. We’ll have to look at East European countries.

Rakesh Sinha: Has the concern been conveyed to the government?.

The Secretary of the Ministry of Human Resource Development is aware of the problems. Recruiting foreign faculty and internationalising our campuses are important if we plan to enter the top 100… I think perception is the most difficult to change and we don’t know how to address it. Maybe we have to organise branding exercises.

Ritika Chopra: Why are not many IIT graduates pursuing PhD abroad?.
This is because of the availability of jobs. Now for a BTech or post-graduate student from IIT-Delhi, there are so many opportunities. They don’t look at the long term. The general perception is that you do a PhD if you want to become a professor, and that is not really true. Many high-tech industries recruit those with PhD but the salary package is not as high as offered to BTech students… But this is where the Prime Minister’s new research fellowship scheme comes into play. PhD candidates will be given Rs 75,000 a month. The fellowship programme is designed to attract BTech students to the PhD programme. Once they complete their PhD, we will try to recruit some of them as faculty. We set a target of 1,000 scholarships this year and Rs 2 lakh per year as contingency. This is almost equal to what an assistant professor gets paid in IIT. Although it’s an attractive scheme, we have been able to recruit only 130 people in the first round.

Ritika Chopra: Are you planning to rework the JEE Advanced format?.

The Bachelor’s programme is no longer our focus anymore. In established IITs, only 40 per cent of our students pursue Bachelor’s degree. The rest are Master’s and PhD students. You cannot get any points by admitting more students at the undergraduate level. The JEE exam is tough. By 1 or 2 marks, the rank can go down by thousands. However tough you may set the exam, at the end of the day, with the kind of preparation that students come with… it’s difficult to make it even tougher. If you make it any simpler, students will score full marks. The JEE exam is an example of supply and demand. The exam is designed to eliminate people or to reject candidates, not to select them. So it is tricky and complicated.
We need more institutions which will offer good Bachelor’s programmes. That’s the solution to the problem. The established IITs should now become research-focused universities. When you think of Stanford, you don’t think of its Bachelor’s programmes. You think of the research. That’s the aura of MIT and Stanford. Although we have more post-graduate students, all our focus happens to be on the undergraduate programme. So we are hoping that at some point of time, the NITs will become as good as the IITs and start offering undergraduate programmes as good as ours. Then IITs can focus more on research and start dealing with society’s problems.

Shradha Chettri: What is the student to teacher ratio in IIT-Delhi?

Currently the ratio is 1:18. You need at least 100 more faculty members to start scoring points in this parameter.

Ritika Chopra: When the government was pushing IITs to have non-residential students, it was resisted…

In South Delhi, we charge Rs 500 per month for hostels. But if you stay outside you need to pay at least Rs 8,000 per month. Many of our students cannot afford that. Starting next year, we are going to separate the accommodation process from the admission process.

Shubhajit Roy: If the IITs are good, why the need to improve perception?,

It is because the media reports these international rankings in a prominent manner. Eventually the government reacts to public pressure. We don’t care. We know that we are good. In terms of undergraduate courses, the IITs are better than the best in the world. But the world also needs to say we are good. The ranking agencies are all private players, they are trying to make money out of that process. And the more serious one becomes about these rankings, the better for them… Many of these ranking organisations also run businesses that help in improving perception.

Ravish Tiwari: The IITs lack appreciation for humanities and social science students. Is there any plan to correct this attitude?

In India, technology institutions have not been able to showcase a lot of the work that has benefited the society. The reason is the fragmented way education is run in this country. You want to do engineering, we created the IITs. You want to do medicine, we created the AIIMS. You want to study management, we created the IIMs. Take the example of doubling farmers’ income by 2022. This requires multiple disciplines to come together.

Somebody has to work on Census, some on understanding the social aspects of it, and some at improving technologies. But this coming together is difficult because of our fragmented education system. We need to make our universities more comprehensive. At IIT-Delhi, we have started a School of Public Policy. Scientists and researchers can work on technological problems and put together a policy document that can help the country.

Ravish Tiwari: Has there been any change in industry-academia ties?

It is changing but slowly. This year, we received sponsored research funding worth about Rs 500 crore. Only 10 per cent of the amount has been given by the industry. This is because industries are not looking at long term like disruptive technologies. When I do research, I find it easier to work with Intel in the US or Portland, than the Bengaluru branch. The kind of work Intel is doing in Bengaluru is not next-generation technology. Many industries in the country are out of sync with academia… Unless industries collaborate with us more closely, we will not see light of the day. Because much of our research starts in the library and ends in the library. We have got the problem from the library and after publishing it goes back to the library.

However, some industries are beginning to look at the long term. When Manohar Parrikar was the defence minister, he asked the Defence Research and Development Organisation (DRDO) to work with the IITs. In the US, a lot of research happens with defence funding. In India, the defence sector had their own DRDO laboratories. Parrikar asked them to collaborate with the IITs and create Joint Advanced Technology Centres. He allotted Rs 200-300 crore. Now defence people have started centres in the IITs in Delhi, Bombay, Madras, and Jadavpur University.

For the first time, we are looking at agricultural problems. The sector was handled by the Indian Council for Agricultural Research (ICAR). Now IIT faculty members have been asked to collaborate with the ICAR. Last week, we signed an MoU with the All India Institute of Ayurveda. Nobody knows what Bhasma, used in Ayurveda, contains. When we analysed it, we found it contains arsenic, sulphur, magnesium etc. These are metals harmful to the body. But Ayurveda seems to work. So if proper procedures are not followed while making Ayurvedic drugs, a lot of issues can arise.

DU admissions 2018: Ragging prevention guidelines, student security tightened .

Delhi University is not just a prestigious institution of knowledge but an experience in itself. Go to any DU student and talk to them about college life and their eyes will fill up with nostalgia. North campus, South campus and everything else in between will mould your college life and leave you with tons of memories. However, if you’ve just joined DU, you are bound to find it’s quirks quite intriguing. Here are 9 things you will only get if you have now joined the emotional whirlwind that is Delhi University!.

DU admission 2018: To protect the interests of its female students, Women police “in plain clothes” will be deployed in and around the colleges and offenders of eve teasing and other incidents will be taken care of.

DU admission 2018:The University of Delhi’s academic session of 2018-19 for undergraduate programmes will commence from today. To control ragging, the varsity has released a notice regarding the prevention of ragging on its college campuses. At a meeting to discuss the issues of ragging, eve-teasing and other prohibited activities the University has formulated a list of measures.

Here are some of the measures taken by the DU to protect its students:

Anti-ragging

To prevent ragging, guardians of all students have been asked to submit undertakings during admissions that their wards will not indulge in such activities. The Delhi University has also set up two Joint Control Rooms in the North and South campus in this regard. Anti-ragging and disciplinary committees will be formed at all institutions to prevent ragging. Institutions will display rules regarding the prohibition of ragging on campus and “extra vigil is being maintained at all eating joints”.

Women’s safety.

To protect the interests of its female students and to provide a level of security the university has tied up with the Delhi Police. Women police “in plain clothes” will be deployed in and around the colleges and offenders of eve-teasing and other incidents will be taken care of. Women police trained in martial arts will also be deployed from the Special Police Unit for Women and Children (SPUWAC) who would not only monitor sensitive points around campus but will also provide training on self-defence to female students. The Delhi University has also asked students to check whether their PG accommodations have been verified by the local police for safety and security reasons.

Outsiders, defacing of property and traffic

The university has noted that outsiders will be prevented from entering colleges, centres and hostels. Defacing of walls using paint, poster or any other method is not allowed and the university has prohibited the display of sensitive posters and graffiti within campus. Traffic at sensitive locations near campus will be regulated by the Delhi Police and students have been advised to use public transport in order to prevent congestion.

How to file a complaint:

– Drop a written complaint in your college complaint box

– Call the National Anti-Ragging helpline number 1800 180 5522

– Call the Joint Control Rooms (North Campus- 27667221; South Campus- 24119832)

– Call 100 or inform your nearest PCR van.


Thanks and regards .

Shivam Tiwari.

Why have the toppers of IIT not become as popular and successful as people like mark Zuckerberg, bill gates and Steve jobs.?

At first glance it might be hard to find too many similarities between Bill Gates, Andy Grove and Steve Jobs apart from the fact that the companies they founded changed the very nature of their respective industries. However in their new book Strategy Rules: Five Timeless Lessons from Bill Gates, Andy Grove, and Steve Jobs, David Yoffie and Michael Cusumano point out that there is far more in common among the former CEOs of Microsoft, Intel and Apple than meets the eye.


Yoffie, the Max and Doris Starr Professor of International Business Administration at Harvard Business School, has been writing case studies on these companies since the late 80s and was also on the board of Intel; Cusumano, professor of management at MIT’s Sloan School of Management, has written a book on Microsoft, and both had a deep insight into just how these companies functioned under their founders. A few years ago, the duo got thinking about how there could be some powerful lessons hidden there on how these men built what are now among the world’s most powerful companies. The catalyst for the book though was the passing of Steve Jobs, soon after he stepped down from actively managing the company. “We wanted a completed record (as CEO) for all three of them so that we would know for sure what worked and what didn’t,” says Yoffie.
Grove took some big, unconventional steps at Intel, like the ‘Intel Inside’ branding campaign and the decision to sole source the 386 microprocessor. “No one in the semi-conductor industry had done this before. Intel was at a little over a billion dollars when it made this multi-billion dollar bet. Even when it came to branding, most of the board thought Grove was crazy,” says Yoffie, who was actively involved with Intel at the time. Infact, once when Grove came back from vacation, he found that the entire campaign budget for ‘Intel Inside’ had been scrapped in his absence. He persisted and eventually, both these moves proved to be extraordinarily successful. This was a risk, but Grove made sure that they spread the bet over time with the capex never going over the long term historical averages, and never actually put the company at risk.

It’s not that they are Smart or Genius, they have special qualities of being Visionary, Risk Taking, Non-Materialistic , Perfect Salesman, Reality distortion field & Pioneer/Innovative.

Many of the people are dropouts like Steve Jobs, Elon Musk etc.

People like Steve Jobs, Traitorous eight, Elon Musk and PayPal Mafia they are have achieved most successful people in silicon valley because of the above qualities.

Visionary:- They had the clear road map of how technology will evolve like Steve Jobs had predicted iPad 30 years ago but technology was not evolve at that time


They were great motivators and intimidators. People strived hard for their praise, and they often got them to do that by intimidating them,” he says.Finally, all three had a paranoid streak and never took success for granted even when they were most successful, by not getting arrogant or comfortable in their success. “All three of them believed that they next problem was around the corner and this really made them push the boundaries at all times,” says Yoffie. All these traits contributed to how they ran their companies and how their employees reacted to them.
All the strategic rules they followed are fairly straightforward and easy for any leader to implement, irrespective of the industry he is in. Among the current generation, leaders like Amazon’s Jeff Bezos, Facebook’s Mark Zuckerbergand Tencent’s Pony Ma are cast in a similar mould. There are a few things leaders end up doing which prevent them from growing their business to its full potential. “Most leaders look back to see what they’ve done successfully in the past and take incremental bets rather than look forward for potential game changers and take big bets,” says Yoffie. If you can think of your organisation and how you can harness the creativity outside the firm to make yourself more successful, it’s easy for anyone to implement these rules irrespective of where they stand in the organisational hierarchy.

Risk Taking:- They would end up taking big risk , they can go to length to which others could, Sometimes they knew that they could easily fail on their ideas that would change the world and yet they took the risk and sometimes go almost bankrupt to become rising billioniares.
Steve Jobs almost became bankrupt in mid-90’s before Pixar IPO which made him billionaire.
Finally, the trio were also similar in possibly the one big mistake they made — the choice of successor. “While the jury is still out on Tim Cook, it appears all three chose someone complementary to themselves, but not a substitute. Steve Ballmer was the perfect complement to Bill Gates and he was critical to making Microsoft successful but couldn’t do what we describe,” says Yoffie. It was the same for Craig Barrett at Intel. The trick then, lies in finding a successor who displays similar characteristics to you, but also has the self-awareness to follow the five strategic rules clearly.

I think none of the IITians have these qualities of taking risk on new ideas such as Touchscreen smartphone or Electric cars.
New Ideas doesn’t means E-commerce or Payment system or drones these already exist.

Non-materialistic:- These people don’t waste their money , instead they invest in making new companies for better part of humanity so that we have the tools to live in comfort..

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I don’t think any of the IITians would leave a high package for their passion. They only want jobs created by these successful people that are secure.
Perfect Salesman:- Whether on stage or at back of stage they know the perfect marketing , adverstisement and salesmanship strategy.
Steve Jobs , Elon musk and other entrepreneur have the perfect Showmanship. They believe that if you don’t show to the people the technology People would’nt understand and it’s usage.
Steve Jobs unveiling the iPhone or Elon musk unveiling the Model 3 .

  1. Reality distortion field:- They believe that they can bend the reality
    What does this mean ? These are the things normal people don’t understand.
    They had their own ideas, their own vision of what a thing/person can be, they were deep down to the believes of their ideas that this could revolutionize the industry and the most importantly they would give tasks to other people which other people thought impossible yet it was possible due to their believe.
    It was also visible in their showmanship when they said “It’s going to cost just $1000” making other people believe that it’s less but after looking other competitor they would say “Why i would give $1000 which is too much expensive”.
  1. Pioneer or Innovative:- Majority people disbelieve that it’s competition it’s not being competitive It’s being innovative/pioneer.
    These People have the thing common is that they were Pioneers in their fielddue to their Pioneering & Innovativeness.
    Design and creating a product from scratch is very hard or inventing new technology such as iPhone or PC
    Ex:- Steve Jobs was pioneer of personal computer revolution but later became an innovator by using the right pieces of technology to create the iPhone, technology was already there for it’s creation for long time.
    Bill Gates was pioneer of software industry.
    IITians should focus on this point as they are educated in a system where they study the existing topics of a book that took people many many years to research they focus on creating some thing new.

    There are thousands of Smart Peoples and Genuises but there are few who are crazy enough to change things.
    Just like Steve Jobs said ““Those who are crazy enough to think they can change the world usually do.”

    What ever people say about you it’s doesn’t matters , what you believe that matters.

Delhi University: 5 things you must do on the first day of college.

Students will be attending the first day at the Delhi University (DU) today. While half of them may be nervous, rest might be excited about meeting the seniors, exploring the college campus, making new friends etc.

formality is done. Documents submitted. Fees paid and congratulations you have got admission in the Delhi University college where nearly three more aspirants competed for the same seat. Like a warrior, you have won a battle, but hold down, the journey has just started. Today is the first day in your college and you must have heard stories on how life here is different from the school. Before you reach your college, we will decode five things that you should do on Day 1.

Attend Orientation Day

Many students do not attend the Orientation Day as they don’t find it necessary. But students, it is not a school assembly, rather this is the first time you will sit inside the big seminar hall or the college auditorium. You will meet your future friends as well as teachers here.

Ragging is banned but meet seniors

A lot of students miss initial days of college due to fear of ragging. We suggest everyone read the Delhi University guidelines and do not let anyone harass you. But yes, introduce yourself to the seniors as they are the best persons to guide you about the subject and college. Their contacts might help you get a good deal in course books.

Find out the college secrets

Every college has its own set of secrets like the hottest couple, the eternal rival college or some must-visit places like the virgin tree at The Hindu college. Get enough inputs or data back home to boost in front of your siblings.

Visit other college canteens

Before you step inside college cafe, try to find out what other colleges canteens are serving. This can be done if you have a friend enrolled in the same college. If the guards don’t let you in, then figure out the best stalls outside to binge in some street food. Making friends in other colleges will give an easy access to all the gossips of that institute.

Discover places around the college

Orientation over. Now take a rickshaw and find out the best places to hang out. While the north and south campuses are known for amazing eateries in and around, colleges outside the campus are mostly closer to some renowned markets/ hang-out zones. Like Lady Irwin College is located around the Connaught Place, Dyal Singh College is just 5 minutes walk away from The India Habitat Centre and Hansraj College is just next to the famous Kamla Nagar market.

Find out the college secrets

Every college has its own set of secrets like the hottest couple, the eternal rival college or some must-visit places like the virgin tree at The Hindu college. Get enough inputs or data back home to boost in front of your siblings.

Visit other college canteens

Before you step inside college cafe, try to find out what other colleges canteens are serving. This can be done if you have a friend enrolled in the same college. If the guards don’t let you in, then figure out the best stalls outside to binge in some street food. Making friends in other colleges will give an easy access to all the gossips of that institute.

Discover places around the college

Orientation over. Now take a rickshaw and find out the best places to hang out. While the north and south campuses are known for amazing eateries in and around, colleges outside the campus are mostly closer to some renowned markets/ hang-out zones. Like Lady Irwin College is located around the Connaught Place, Dyal Singh College is just 5 minutes walk away from The India Habitat Centre and Hansraj College is just next to the famous Kamla Nagar market.

Why is the phrase” JEE hila nhi isliye BITs pilani” famous among IITians.

It isn’t just restricted to BITS guys. IITians make fun of everyone.

They call NITians as NIIT students(This especially hurts if you’re from the top NITs since you’ve probably left a very good branch in an IIT to join branch of your choice their).

They call IIIT Hyderabad guys as coders and nothing else.(Despite ignoring the fact that IIIT Hyderabad publishes more papers than even IIT Roorkee and IIT Guwahati in the CS and ECE domain).

DU students as people who couldn’t handle science and hence took up commerce. (Than when the same DU students get into IIM ABC at lower cat percentiles they make fun of them by saying IIMs have got reservations for Commerce people).

They call IIT MTech students as Matkas.

And if you’re from a new IIT they will flaunt the IIT Tag everywhere since that is the only thing they’ve got to show( since during placement season barely any companies come).

This happens more due to their own insecurity.

The NITian with the better branch gets a better job.

The IIIT Hyderabad guy thanks to the fact that he has published papers in top journals easily gets into a Phd programme in the US.

The DU guy cracks IIM Ahemdabad and will be earning 20 lpa+ in two years.

The “Matka” gets an offer to do Phd in a foreign university or one of the professors who really liked him makes him his Phd student or he leaves with a good job during campus placements.

The guy from the New IITs realizes that how important an alumni network is and wishes that he had one.

So it is just one of the side effects of becoming an IITian,you start down looking on everybody else aka you become a pretentious watermouth who has achieved nothing. Many of these people eventually end up in places like kota where they preach the next generation of students on the virtues of becoming an IITian since well it much easier to convince an 11th grader about the benefits of becoming an IITian than a HR Manager who will ask for your grades and will grill you in an interview.

First of all, this question needs to be a lot specific. Comparison between Bits Pilani Pilani campus and one of the new IITs is meaningless. Same applies to comparison between an old IIT and Bits Goa/Hyderabad/Dubai(?) campuses.

Secondly, what makes a college better depends on the individual and his requirements. But answering the question in a general sense, the real bugger is comparison between Bits Pilani Pilani Campus and an old IIT like IIT Bombay.

Since this answer requires a subjective treatment,there is a lot of ground to cover, so hold back,stretch your hands,relax, make yourself a coffee and find a good couch as this will take time to read.

First lets analyze on points that are believed to give Bits an edge over the IITS:

(1)Reservation:

Reservation is one messed up system and we do have students above 5k rank in core branches, boasting their IITB credentials as if they really have achieved something. Situation is even worse in other IITs as IITB witnesses higher cutoffs than any other IIT. However the rest half are arguably the cream students of the country and for a population of 1.3 billion, that’s saying a lot. This makes IITB an incredibly competitive place and in general, the level and quality of competition is definitely much higher than that in Bits.

Besides majority of students in Bits also have ranks above 5k ,so even the reserved crowd logically offers more or less the same competition. IIT(old)ians in departments like electrical and cs, whether reserved(OBC) or not, still possess much higher ranks than Bitsians. The OBC btech cutoff for cs and electrical at iitb remains around 300 and 1200 respectively. Nobody with right mindset would have chosen Bits with those ranks. SC/ST’s are whole other stories but they comprise just 22% of the population. So the general crowd in an old IIT based on entrance tests is better than the regular Bitsian crowd. The best in IIT are at whole new level while the mediocre are not so bad.

The impact of reservation on overall quality is felt only in new iits. One plus point that one may feel is that it is not difficult to score more than the average even if you perform poor, thanks to reservation. On the flip side, try to score maximum marks in an exam and you will regret being born.

(2)No attendance: This is a major argument given against IITs that Bits follows zero attendance policy and hence gives more freedom to its students. However this hardly makes a difference as professors in Bits ensure attendance through unannounced tut tests or covering stuff out of slides in lectures. Besides most of the courses at IITB also(at least in year 1) are relaxed on attendance and it really depends on the professor. Most of the courses in the first year IITB had no attendance requirement. Following a passion during lecture hours doesn’t make much sense if you want a decent academic record. The only relaxation that zero attendance policy provides is that one will still be allowed to give term end exams even with zero attendance, or one can pay uninterrupted attention to private endeavors like startup, etc.

(3)Dual Degree: This is really a very nice policy at Bits where they have integrated Msc courses with BE ones. Hence one can graduate with both a bachelors and a masters degree in different streams and this allows for a lot of flexibility. Any engineering stream of one’s choice can be clubbed with the dual at a low cgpa cutoff. Dual degrees certainly provide Bits an edge over IITs. I have never heard of such a thing at IITB at least. Correct me if I am wrong.

For people smartly pointing out that IITB also has dual degree courses, take a deep breath and try to understand what’s being said here. The dual courses in iit is very different from bits pilani even though both are called dual degrees. See comments for more info.

(4)Practice Schools: Another good policy of Bits. Students are almost certain to be interned at the end of second and fourth year. There are extremely high number of opportunities at IITB also but there is no certainty. The minor flip side is that you cannot attend PS2 if you missed PS1.

(5)Deciding own timetable: In Bits you can choose own timetable but that’s only if you have a high PR number(randomly generated each semester) else you will have to compromise on your instructors/schedule. All this is not of much consequence overall.

(6)Fees: Fees in Bits is a tad higher than IITB but you get exemption on fees if you perform well in Bits. There is no such provisions at IITB. SC/STs study at this premier most institute for free and no reason at all. The closest you can come is a Merit-Cum-Need or some private scholarship. All this is pretty irritating.

Edit: Fees is no longer a tad bit higher in bits as the administration there treats the students as gold mines for its vision 2020.

(7)Seclusion: Pilani is located very remotely with nearest cities being Delhi and Jaipur, both around 200 kms far. So for every little initiative or career requirement you have to shuttle between cities. Though the enthusiasm for startup is great at Pilani, one has to travel to Delhi again and again to run it. IITB being located right in the financial capital of the nation offers much more opportunities and attracts companies more.

Comparison of experience at both the institutes.

  1. Campus: Both the institutes have a breathtaking campus to boast, with IITB campus being larger and greener, while the Pilani campus being cosier and less green due to the geographical location of Pilani. The Bits campus is slightly better maintained and has got more places where you can simply lay down,relax and stargaze or something like that. The Saraswati Temple , the grass area of NAB(New Academy Buildings), and the Sky Lawns are great places to spend time in peace.

Meanwhile the IITB campus feels more spacious and has a cooler appeal to it.

2.Clubs: Club culture in Bits is more or less meaningless. The first few weeks of a fresher is spent in tedious interactions with seniors and if you can impress them, you might get selected in a department. Interactions for clubs are meaningless as ultimately auditions for them are what that matters eventually. Further if you somehow couldn’t make into a club that you are interested in, there is very little possibility you will be given a second chance. However once you do get in a C/D, you will spend a good time. One positive aspect of this is that senior-junior interaction at bits is very high from the start.You make contacts with tons of seniors effortlessly, which kind of felt missing at IITB where there was minimal interaction in the beginning..

3.Ragging: Zero(rather negative) in IITB, dismal in Bits Pilani. Only during interactions when you visit seniors, you might be asked to give your intro and stuff but everything’s under control. In IITB if a senior is caught in a fresher hostel, he will face a hard time justifying that.

Besides that, there is an excellent system at IITB to provide a 4th year student as ISMP mentor to the freshers to assist them in all their difficulties and guide them.

ISMP mentor to the freshers to assist them in all their difficulties and guide them.

Meanwhile the IITB campus feels more spacious and has a cooler appeal to it.

Overall, both campuses are worth taking a pause to appreciate their beauty.

2.Clubs: Club culture in Bits is more or less meaningless. The first few weeks of a fresher is spent in tedious interactions with seniors and if you can impress them, you might get selected in a department. Interactions for clubs are meaningless as ultimately auditions for them are what that matters eventually. Further if you somehow couldn’t make into a club that you are interested in, there is very little possibility you will be given a second chance. However once you do get in a C/D, you will spend a good time. One positive aspect of this is that senior-junior interaction at bits is very high from the start.You make contacts with tons of seniors effortlessly, which kind of felt missing at IITB where there was minimal interaction in the beginning.

In IITB, scenario is different as “enthu” is the main thing that’s required. Anyone can work if one is interested. For tech teams, of course they expect you have the required skills if you join late, but the process is much less stringent. The orientation of each club were exciting events and the participation was purely voluntary.

Both institutes have clubs for most of the activities.

3.Ragging: Zero(rather negative) in IITB, dismal in Bits Pilani. Only during interactions when you visit seniors, you might be asked to give your intro and stuff but everything’s under control. In IITB if a senior is caught in a fresher hostel, he will face a hard time justifying that.

Besides that, there is an excellent system at IITB to provide a 4th year student as ISMP mentor to the freshers to assist them in all their difficulties and guide them.

4.Facilities:

  • Mess- Food quality is slightly better at IITB. IIT mess is somewhat better as it serves 4 times a day, provides more variety to food than Bits mess, has wifi, TV and is more spacious. However Bits compensates that by having a nice canteen in the mess itself and by organizing regional dinners called “Grubs”.
    • Library-Bits library is better hands down. Its much larger, aesthetically much more beautiful, calmer and has got an excellent environment and facilities to read and study. Obviously all sorts of books are available at both libraries, its just that the Bits library is better built and maintained. Plus its got a nice CCD machine.
    • Workshop-Mechanical Workshop in Bits was much better than at IITB with more shops and stricter first year course that focused heavily on the details of the processes involved. Plus the equipments were provided in the workshop itself and needn’t be bought,unlike at IITB.
    • Internet-
    • Net speed at Bits made me laugh and cry at the same time. Wifi speed is okayish while Lan speed is laughable. There were restrictions on many sites. The only relief were the software labs in NAB but that too was closed after midnight. One had to rely on mobile data outside hostels and DC++ to download stuff.
    • IITB on the other hand offers high Lan and wifi speed clocking around 100mbps and has got wifi in every building. There is no restriction of any kind, except torrents. So IITB has a lot better internet connectivity
  • Hospital-
  • Bits had a medical center that closed down in the evening(lol) and in cases of emergency you would have to call the warden who will in turn either come himself with his car, or send for an ambulance. Besides one cannot expect very good medical services in a small town like Pilani. The medical center was also not very up to the mark.
  • The IIT hospital is a very large one with 24 hour emergency service, very sincere ambulance service and highly skilled doctors. A medical file of each student is maintained and the medicines are supplied free/subsidized rates. One can find medical assistance for any trouble.
    • Infrastructure:
    • The Saraswati Temple,Rotunda, NAB area and FD5 are really well built and comfortable to spend time in. The Bits campus is small so reaching from one place to another usually take no longer than 15 minutes. However the SAC and GymG(sports ground) were small and very ordinary and there were not much scope to pursue a new skill/sport if you are a beginner. IITB on the other hand has a very good Lecture Hall Complex and excellent facilities at SAC, better roads in the campus, more comfortable classrooms and really nice auditoriums.