JEE Main 2019: यहां देखें जेईई मुख्य परीक्षा 2019 की आधिकारिक अधिसूचना, परीक्षा तिथियां, योग्यता और अन्य विवरण ?

नई दिल्ली. JEE Main 2019: पिछले महीने एमएचआरडी (मानव संसाधन विकास मंत्रालय) ने घोषणा की कि अगले वर्ष से जेईई मेन (संयुक्त प्रवेश परीक्षा) एक वर्ष में दो बार आयोजित की जाएगी. अगले वर्ष से राष्ट्रीय परीक्षण एजेंसी (एनटीए) जेईई मेन परीक्षा आयोजित करेगी. एनटीए इस महीने के अंत तक जेईई मेन 2019 परीक्षा के लिए आधिकारिक अधिसूचना जारी करेगा. यहां पूरा विवरण दिया गया है.

जेईई मेन 2019 परीक्षा आधिकारिक अधिसूचना और परीक्षा तिथियां
राष्ट्रीय परीक्षण एजेंसी इस महीने या 1 सितंबर को पहली संयुक्त प्रवेश परीक्षा परीक्षा के लिए अधिसूचना जारी करेगी. टेंटेटिव शेड्यूल के अनुसार एनटीए 1 सितंबर से आवेदन पत्र जमा करने की प्रक्रिया भी शुरू करेगा. उम्मीद की जाती है कि एनटीए ऑनलाइन आवेदन प्रक्रिया शुरू होने से 1-2 दिन पहले जेईई मेन परीक्षा के लिए अधिसूचना जारी करेगी.

प्रक्रिया 1 सितंबर से शुरू होगी और आवेदन पत्र जमा करने की अंतिम तिथि 30 सितंबर होगी. जेईई 2018 मेन्स परीक्षा 6 जनवरी 2019 से 20 जनवरी 2019 तक आयोजित की जाएगी. संयुक्त प्रवेश परीक्षा का परिणाम फरवरी के पहले सप्ताह में होगा.

जेईई मेन परीक्षा के परिणाम की घोषणा के बाद जेईई मेन अप्रैल 2019 परीक्षा के लिए ऑनलाइन आवेदन प्रक्रिया शुरू होगी. जेईई मेन 2019 परीक्षा के लिए टेंटेटिव शेड्यूल के अनुसार ऑनलाइन आवेदन प्रक्रिया फरवरी के दूसरे सप्ताह में शुरू होगी. परीक्षा 7 अप्रैल से 21 अप्रैल, 2019 तक आयोजित की जाएगी. जेईई मेन 2019 जुलाई का परिणाम मई के पहले सप्ताह में होगा.

उम्मीदवार या तो एक परीक्षा या दोनों परीक्षा दे सकते हैं. इस परीक्षा में उम्मीदवारों को दी गई तिथियों से परीक्षा की तारीख चुनने का विकल्प होगा. जेईई मेन 2019 परीक्षा के लिए पाठ्यक्रम एक ही रहेगा. राष्ट्रीय परीक्षण एजेंसी ऑनलाइन मोड में मुख्य परीक्षा आयोजित करेगी और पेन .

जेईई मेन परीक्षा 2019 (जनवरी) टेंटेटिव शेड्यूल इस प्रकार है.

आधिकारिक अधिसूचना रिलीज- अगस्त या 1 सितंबर को
ऑनलाइन आवेदन- 1 सितंबर से 30 सितंबर
जेईई मेन परीक्षा परीक्षा- 6 जनवरी से 20 जनवरी
रिजल्ट की घोषणा- फरवरी के पहले सप्ताह
जेईई मेन परीक्षा- अप्रैल 2019
ऑनलाइन आवेदन जमा करना- फरवरी 2019 दूसरे सप्ताह
जेईई मेन के लिए ऑनलाइन परीक्षा- 7 अप्रैल से 21 अप्रैल, 2019
जेईई मुख्य परिणाम- मई 2019 के पहले सप्ताह में.

Thanks and regards.

Shivam Tiwari.

DU 7th cut-off 2018: Seats available in popular colleges ?

DU 7th cut-off 2018: The cut-off remains high with Miranda College demanding 96.25 per cent for English (Hons) while Ramjas has set 94.25 per cent for the general category.

DU 7th cut-off 2018:Delhi University has released the seventh cut-off for admission to undergraduate (UG) courses (based on merit) for the academic session 2018-2019. The candidates have to visit the respective colleges to complete the admission formalities on August 6, that is, Monday. The cut-off remains high with Miranda College demanding 96.25 per cent for English (Hons) while Ramjas has set 94.25 per cent for the general category.

At Gargi college, seats are still vacant for popular courses like BA (English), B Com. The cut-off for English (Hons) stands at 93.50 per cent and B Com stands at 95.50 per cent for general category candidates. Similarly, there are seats available in History (Hons). However, in popular colleges like Hansraj and Hindu college, seats are available for the reserved category candidates. In Kirorimal College, any candidate that has scored 94 per cent can take admission.

DU admissions 2018: Documents required.

. _Class 10 Board exam certificate (from any recognised Board).

._Class 10 Board exam mark sheet (from any recognised Board).

._Class 12 Board or Plus Two/ Inter exam certificate (from any recognised Board). If students haven’t received their certificates, then ensure to carry the provisional certificates given by the school.

._Class 12 Board exam mark sheet (from any recognised Board).

._Admission form print out.

._Reserved category certificates (in the name of the candidate) issued by the competent authority.

._Transfer certificate from school or college.

._Migration Certificate from Board or University.

._Passport size self-attested photographs.

._Original copy of the registration form.

._Pass certificate for Class 10 English (for students who did not appear in compulsory English).

Thanks and regards.

Shivam tiwari

Want to become a super Thinker? Read these thought provoking Books.

Fun factoid: According to one study from the London School of Economics and Political Science, liberal atheists have IQs that are six points higher on average than devout conservatives.

Life is a never-ending learning process.

The moment you stop learning… you start dying.

Reading makes you smarter and better.

It’s the ideal form of brain exercise.

Want to gain greater control over yourself and develop the self-mastery and awareness required to think, act, and be an intelligent person.

Make reading a habit.

These thought-provoking books will shape your perception, worldview, and beliefs about life and living it. They will help you train your brain to work effortlessly in your favor.

Happy reading!.

In a 45 minute read, a former spy introduces two simple tools for thinking.

That’s the chain of thinking: D-A-D-A. Getting data leads to analysis. Analysis leads to a decision. A decision leads to an action. Simple. That’s how thinking works.”

“We live in a fog of uncertainty. Good thinking removes some of the fog. Never all of it.”

“Without good analysis, we can’t make good decisions. Without good analysis, we can’t even figure out what our options are.”

“Notice the end: Action. If thinking doesn’t end with action, it’s useless. Taking action is why we think. If you’re thinking just to think, that’s useless, too.”

Thomas offers a guide to the fallacy of the obvious in everyday life.

A person’s conclusions can only be as solid as the information on which they are based. Thus, a person who is exposed to almost nothing but inaccurate information on a given subject almost inevitably develops an erroneous belief, a belief that can seem to be “an irresistible product” of the individual’s (secondhand) experience.”

“People will always prefer black-and-white over shades of grey, and so there will always be the temptation to hold overly-simplified beliefs and to hold them with excessive confidence”

This books is a collection of some of the most important ideas drawn from the works of great thinkers.

simplicity is really an achievement — it follows from hard-won clarity about what matters.”

“Aristotle also observed that every virtue seems to be bang in the middle of two vices. It occupies what he termed ‘the golden mean’ between two extremes of character.”

“The primary thing we need to learn is not just maths or spelling, but how to be good: we need to learn about courage, self-control, reasonableness, independence and calm.

This is an entirely new understanding of the hidden mental processes that secretly govern every aspect of our behaviour.

Acknowledging that you do not have complete free will, or complete conscious control, actually increases the amount of free will and control you truly have.”

“The unconscious evaluation of everything does appear to be a very old and primitive effect that existed long before we developed conscious and deliberate modes of thought.”

History is written by the victors, but it’s victims who write the memoirs.”

“Most people, when directly confronted by evidence that they are wrong, do not change their point of view or course of action but justify it even more tenaciously. Even irrefutable evidence is rarely enough to pierce the mental armor of self-justification.”

“Prejudices emerge from the disposition of the human mind to perceive and process information in categories. “Categories” is a nicer, more neutral word than “stereotypes,” but it’s the same thing.”

Thanks and regards.

Shivam Tiwari.

Three hacks to help your brain learn stuff faster.

Three hacks to help your brain learn stuff faster.

  • Tap into the spacing effect. Skill-acquisition isn’t an event, it’s a process. …
  • Train your basal ganglia. Most of us focus on comprehension when we’re attempting to improve a skill. …
  • Stop trying to stretch your attention span. …
  • 6 teens designed this wacky green building of the future..

    TAP INTO THE SPACING EFFECT.

    Skill-acquisition isn’t an event, it’s a process. If you truly want to master a new skill, it’s far better to invest small amounts of time over an extended period than a large amount of time all at once. This is what researchers call the “spacing effect,” which refers to the finding that skill-development tends to improve when learning is spaced out over time.

    You’re probably thinking, “But wait, wouldn’t this take longer?” Not necessarily. Because the spacing effect has been shown to boost retention, spreading out your learning process over a period of time limits the likelihood that you’ll have to go back to brush up (or start over completely) a week or a month or a year later. Since the late 19th century, psychologists (and anyone who’s ever crammed for an exam) have known that one of the biggest hindrances to learning is forgetting. So, counterintuitive as it may sound, being a little more patient in the short term may help you reduce your overall time spent learning in the long-run.

    Most of us focus on comprehension when we’re attempting to improve a skill. That may seem sensible enough, but science shown that while understanding is vital to heightening proficiency (it’s hard to improve when you don’t know how), it isn’t enough to obtain mastery. Turning any newly acquired knowledge into an actual skill requires engaging a part of your brain that heavily impacts learning and movement, known as the “basal ganglia.”

    TEACH SOMEONE ELSE (OR JUST PRETEND TO)

    If you imagine that you’ll need to teach someone else the material or task you are trying to grasp, you can speed up your learning and remember more, according to a studydone at Washington University in St. Louis. The expectation changes your mind-set so that you engage in more effective approaches to learning than those who simply learn to pass a test, according to John Nestojko, a postdoctoral researcher in psychology and coauthor of the study.

Ramanujan got only 57% in Mathematics in his first examination of the arts(FA exam). He is still a genius in mathematics. How is this possible?

Srinivasa Ramanujan, (born December 22, 1887, Erode, India—died April 26, 1920, Kumbakonam), Indian mathematician whose contributions to the theory of numbers include pioneering discoveries of the properties of the partition function.


When he was 15 years old, he obtained a copy of George Shoobridge Carr’s Synopsis of Elementary Results in Pure and Applied Mathematics, 2 vol. (1880–86). This collection of thousands of theorems, many presented with only the briefest of proofs and with no material newer than 1860, aroused his genius. Having verified the results in Carr’s book, Ramanujan went beyond it, developing his own theorems and ideas. In 1903 he secured a scholarship to the University of Madras but lost it the following year because he neglected all other studies in pursuit of mathematics.

If Ramanujan failed a Math testEducation and Exams are about the box., it means the test failed itself. It speaks more about the failure of the system than about the capabilities of the person.

System Design

I have always scored in the top 2/3 ranks in the class and usually 100/100 in math. Precisely because I was no math genius. If the test is designed for identifying who is the best average person, then the best will be the average. Our education system is primarily designed for addressing the problems of the middle of the bell curve. Because, this group represents the biggest chunk of the population and the outcomes are always measured in the averages [the average pass rate is 90% or the average proficiency of a student was x].

Since the system is neither designed for the game changers nor for the people with genuine learning disabilities, they will both be given worst of the hardships. The worst part is that the system cannot identify the difference between the game changers and the people needing more help learning. It confuses the two and makes things worse for the game changers.

Identifying a Genius

It is not easy for non-geniuses to identify a genius. Professor Hardy was a genius and he thus was able to identify Ramanujan’s genius. Ramanujan was lucky here. 1000s of Ramanujans might languish with morons who have no sense of what a genius looks like. Our system is unfortunately populated by poor quality teachers recruited from the bottom of the barrel. They are often intolerant and incapable of having the patience to see the ingenuity.
Although I despise reality television, I can still see some value in shows like “America has got talent” and all its regional variations. We are often stunned by the talent in the unknown, ordinary people. Think of how many such researchers or inventors are hiding behind the veil of mediocrity.

Education and Exams are about the box.

Education and Exams are about the box

Schools and colleges have a purpose. Historically, they educated students for the workforce. The system has little capability of going far beyond that. Thus, if a student doesn’t perform in those exams, it might just mean that he doesn’t fit inside the box. Thomas Edison didn’t. Steve Jobs didn’t. Henry Ford didn’t. and Ramanujan didn’t. Of course, if you are testing these smart minds on how well they will fit in a box and the potential to work in some office, of course they will fail. Because, they are not born to work in an office.

Some tips for government to get better:

  1. Consciously look for geniuses. When you are really looking to identify these genius inventors, you might have better chance.
  2. Once you identify, put them on a separate track. Don’t get them lost in the din of mediocrity. Let them be challenged by their genius peers instead of feeling smug or lost when they are the only genius around.

Thanks and regards .

Shivam tiwari

Tips to improve memory.

HOW TO FOCUS BETTER, BOOST CONCENTRATION & AVOID DISTRACTIONS.

Effective study.can only be achieved if you’re able to focus your complete attention on what you are trying to learn. If you are unable to concentrate fully on what you are doing because you’re constantly being distracted, or your thoughts are going elsewhere, your process of learning will be interrupted.
Concentration is the ability to focus all attention on the activity at hand and block out all other unnecessary thoughts and distractions. Taking your mind off all other things and completely focusing on the task at hand. According to researchers at the University of California Irvine, it takes an average of 23 minutes and 15 seconds to get back to the task following a distraction.


By the time you’ve finished this guide you’ll know exactly what to do to focus better, boost concentration and avoid distractions. You can use the quick links below to jump to a particular area of interested.

  1. Give your brain a workout
  2. Don’t skip the physical exercise
  3. Get your Zs
  4. Make time for friends
  5. Keep stress in check
  6. Have a laugh
  7. Eat a brain-boosting diet
  8. Identify and treat health problems
  9. Take practical steps to support learning and memory.

Tip 1: Give your brain a workout.

By the time you’ve reached adulthood, your brain has developed millions of neural pathways that help you process and recall information quickly, solve familiar problems, and execute familiar tasks with a minimum of mental effort. But if you always stick to these well-worn paths, you aren’t giving your brain the stimulation it needs to keep growing and developing. You have to shake things up from time to time!

Memory, like muscular strength, requires you to “use it or lose it.” The more you work out your brain, the better you’ll be able to process and remember information. But not all activities are equal. The best brain exercises break your routine and challenge you to use and develop new brain pathways.

  1. It teaches you something new. No matter how intellectually demanding the activity, if it’s something you’re already good at, it’s not a good brain exercise. The activity needs to be something that’s unfamiliar and out of your comfort zone. To strengthen the brain, you need to keep learning and developing new skills.
  2. It’s challenging. The best brain-boosting activities demand your full and close attention. It’s not enough that you found the activity challenging at one point. It must still be something that requires mental effort. For example, learning to play a challenging new piece of music counts. Playing a difficult piece you’ve already memorized does not.
  3. It’s a skill you can build on. Look for activities that allow you to start at an easy level and work your way up as your skills improve —always pushing the envelope so you continue to stretch your capabilities. When a previously difficult level starts to feel comfortable, that means it’s time to tackle the next level of performance.
  1. It’s rewarding. Rewards support the brain’s learning process. The more interested and engaged you are in the activity, the more likely you’ll be to continue doing it and the greater the benefits you’ll experience. So choose activities that, while challenging, are still enjoyable and satisfying.

Think of something new you’ve always wanted to try, like learning how to play the guitar, make pottery, juggle, play chess, speak French, dance the tango, or master your golf swing. Any of these activities can help you improve your memory, so long as they keep you challenged and engaged.

  • Aerobic exercise is particularly good for the brain, so choose activities that keep your blood pumping. In general, anything that is good for your heart is great for your brain.
  • Does it take you long time to clear out the sleep fog when you wake up? If so, you may find that exercising in the morning before you start your day makes a big difference. In addition to clearing out the cobwebs, it also primes you for learning throughout the day.
  • Physical activities that require hand-eye coordination or complex motor skills are particularly beneficial for brain building.
  • Exercise breaks can help you get past mental fatigue and afternoon slumps. Even a short walk or a few jumping jacks can be enough to reboot your brain.

Thanks and regards.

Shivam Tiwari.

JEE main 2019 preparation tips.

If you want to crack JEE Main 2019 with good marks then start your preparation today by following the below given tips-.

Some Important Topics of Syllabus.

Create Short Notes– While studying for the entrance test, clear your basic concepts and make short notes so that you can revise the important facts and figures at any place and time.

Don’t Skip any topic– Sometimes, students leave a few important topics because of their less weightage in board examination. This practice will hamper your JEE Main preparation. Hence, to crack JEE Main 2019 with good marks study every topics and chapter.

Preparing for the JEE Main exam will be one of the most rewarding things for your career and days to come. Having strong basics in Physics, Maths and Chemistry can really open up a lot of avenues for you in the future.

More than preparing for JEE Main 2018 exam, think about these 2 years (or 1 year?) as your foundation stone towards a brighter future in terms of better grades during your Engineering College, Interviews for high paying jobs, Higher Studies – the list is endless.

Time Management

Even before I go into tell you about how you should prepare yourself for the Maths, Physics or Chemistry, you need to pay attention to this – Without time management no magic is going to help you reach your goals, which is All India Rank 1!

Follow the schedule and make a plan.

Remember, I told you about making a habit in the last point. Right from tomorrow, when you get from bed, make it an habit to spend 15 – 30 minutes to plan your day.

Planning your day will set the fact in your brain that you have X number of tasks to complete and thereby you will waste much less time. See, how time management and planning your day are so related!

Here is how you can plan your day in 7 easy steps:

2.1. First, get a calendar, a dairy and a pen – to make a planner to routine up your time. You could also use mobile apps like Wunderlist or Any.DO

Know the syllabus and the exam pattern well (including weightage)

The JEE Main and Advanced Syllabus is vast and in order to get a very good rank you must make sure that you go through all the 3 subjects and have almost equal command over all of them.

You should study all the important topics first and then solve ample problems in order to gain mastery over them. Certain topics in the JEE Main & Advanced syllabus has more weightage over others, so laying more stress on these important topics will help you score more marks in the actual exam and thus fetching you a top rank!

The tough topics obviously have more weightage so without any concession you ought to study them properly. Also, this would let you divide your time well in advance among the various subjects.

Before you start your preparation you must go though the List of most important topics in JEE Main & Advanced. Apart from these you should also study the Expected chapter weightage in the JEE Main syllabus which can be found here.

Coaching Classes – Online or Offline?

Coaching classes are a crucial part of your JEE Preparation. Be it Main or Advanced, having crystal clear concepts will always help you in scoring high and getting that extra edge over others in the exam.

Back in the day when I was preparing for IIT JEE, I and other JEE aspirants all across India had access to only physical coaching centers. It used to be the best option to prepare for JEE exams back then. But now you have access to study materials and lectures right at your finger tips, thanks to the online revolution in India.

According to some stats, 45 – 50% students are now opting for Online Coaching classes as compared to the physical media such as coaching classes and study centers.

Let us quickly go over the pros and cons of both these types of coaching classes.

Study concepts, solve problems, look at solutions

No matter how many coaching classes you join or how many more study materials / books you buy, you have to spend time studying these materials and lecture notes.

Self-study is one of the most important aspects of your JEE Main & Advanced preparation. Here are some quick tips on how to study more hours daily without getting tired.

The more time you devote towards clearing your concepts in various topics of Physics, Chemistry and Maths – the better are your chances of getting a top rank in the JEE.

Best books for JEE 2019 preparation.

Books recommendation for JEE( main + Advanced ) Preparation.

Best Books to Prepare for JEE Main 2019- Every year, CBSE conducts IIT JEE Examination in the month of April to shortlist eligible candidates for UG engineering courses offered by elite Institutes including IITs, NITs, GFTIs and more. JEE Main 2019 will be conducted in online and offline mode to test the knowledge of aspirants. The questions in JEE Main and JEE advanced will be asked from Physics, Chemistry & Mathematics.

Lakhs of candidates appear for JEE Main Examination with a dream to get admission in IITs but only a few of them will be able to crack the exam with good marks.

You may think, why this difference? What’s the difference between the toppers and losers?

Dedication and right approach is the key to qualify JEE Main and JEE Advanced.


Students keep pondering on what and how to study so that they can get high scores. Hence, to assist the aspirants, we have listed 12 Best Books for JEE Main preparation. Refer these study material and start studying from the very instance-

12 Best Books to Prepare for JEE Main 2019

Reference Books for Physics1Concepts of Physics Part 1nd 2 by H.C. VermaHC Verma2Problems In GENERAL PHYSICSI.E. Irodov3Science For Everyone : Aptitude Test Problem In PhysicsS.S. KrotovReference Books for Chemistry4Organic ChemistryMorrison Boyd5Inorganic Chemistry for JEE(Main & Advanced)O.P. Tandon6Concise Inorganic Chemistry for JEE (Main & Advanced)J.D. Lee7Numerical Chemistry for JEE(Main & Advanced)P.BahadurReference Books for Mathematics8Golden Differential CalculusN.P Bali9Problems Plus in IIT MathematicsA Das Gupta10Class XI and XII MathematicsR.D. Sharma11Higher AlgebraHall and Knight12Trigonometry, Geometry BooksS.L. Loney.

‘Any simpler, and students will get 100%. JEE is designed to reject, not select… Need more institutes’ .

Ritika Chopra: How will the Institution of Eminence (IoE) status help IIT-Delhi?

IIT-Delhi Director V Ramgopal Rao talks about the problems in breaking into top 100 in world rankings, why students are not doing PhD, the need for industry to pitch in for research, the ‘fragmented education system’, and how race for board marks and grind of coaching institutes are affecting the kind of students they get.

We are quite excited that we have been considered for IoE; only two IITs have been considered. We have received an email from the secretary concerned on our fund requirements in the first year and what we want to accomplish with it. We are supposed to get Rs 200 crore every year for the next five years. We are preparing the budget for the first year.

Ritika Chopra: What did IIT-Delhi propose in terms of infrastructure and courses in the application?.

Organisations such as QS Ranking mark institutions on five parameters. One is international students. We have a few international students but that doesn’t give us any points. We got zero in terms of international faculty. As the government has been giving us funds, we had no motivation to earn from student fees, which makes 5 per cent of our total budget. Unlike American universities, our intention was not to admit more students and earn money… Therefore, we never needed international students. The government never gave us the freedom, so we were never able to recruit foreign faculty. About a year ago, when the faculty situation became severe, we started five- year contract positions.

The third parameter was faculty-to- student ratio. We are not able to recruit enough faculty because we don’t get quality applications. In IIT, many of the faculty we recruit are people who have studied in the institution, gone to the US to complete their PhD, and then joined us. But in the last five-seven years, IIT students are not going abroad for higher education. Last year, only 5 per cent of our students did so. Our faculty pool is fast drying.
Therefore, on three parameters we get zero.

‘Any simpler, and students will get 100%. JEE is designed to reject, not select… Need more institutes’

IIT-Delhi Director V Ramgopal Rao talks about the problems in breaking into top 100 in world rankings, why students are not doing PhD, the need for industry to pitch in for research, the ‘fragmented education system’, and how race for board marks and grind of coaching institutes are affecting the kind of students they get.

Ritika Chopra: How will the Institution of Eminence (IoE) status help IIT-Delhi?

We are quite excited that we have been considered for IoE; only two IITs have been considered. We have received an email from the secretary concerned on our fund requirements in the first year and what we want to accomplish with it. We are supposed to get Rs 200 crore every year for the next five years. We are preparing the budget for the first year.

Ritika Chopra: What did IIT-Delhi propose in terms of infrastructure and courses in the application?

Organisations such as QS Ranking mark institutions on five parameters. One is international students. We have a few international students but that doesn’t give us any points. We got zero in terms of international faculty. As the government has been giving us funds, we had no motivation to earn from student fees, which makes 5 per cent of our total budget. Unlike American universities, our intention was not to admit more students and earn money… Therefore, we never needed international students. The government never gave us the freedom, so we were never able to recruit foreign faculty. About a year ago, when the faculty situation became severe, we started five- year contract positions.

The third parameter was faculty-to- student ratio. We are not able to recruit enough faculty because we don’t get quality applications. In IIT, many of the faculty we recruit are people who have studied in the institution, gone to the US to complete their PhD, and then joined us. But in the last five-seven years, IIT students are not going abroad for higher education. Last year, only 5 per cent of our students did so. Our faculty pool is fast drying.
Therefore, on three parameters we get zero.

Two parameters for which we get some marks are research output and institution perception. For research output, IIT-D gets about 90 out of 100 marks. When it comes to research, we are ranked 39th in the world and are better than many American universities. Nobody thinks of India in terms of technology. So in terms of perception, we score 45 out of 100 marks.

So when we put all that together, we are ranked 172nd in the world right now. With IoE, the main goal is to enter the top 100. We need to start scoring in those parameters where we are getting zero. We have no choice but to admit foreign students. Our exams have become so tough now that I don’t think foreign students can qualify. To crack the entrance examination you need to cut yourself off for three years and prepare. The joint entrance examination (JEE) is being conducted in five other countries. Last year, we had a South Korean student. But that is because the student’s parents are in India. This year we don’t have any foreign student… At the BTech level, I don’t think we can change anything. But at the PhD level we can open up our programmes because there is more flexibility. Currently, IIT-Delhi has about 2,500 PhD students and we will increase that to 5,000….
Getting foreign faculty is difficult. Getting somebody from a top US school for the salary we offer will be tough. We’ll have to look at East European countries.

Rakesh Sinha: Has the concern been conveyed to the government?.

The Secretary of the Ministry of Human Resource Development is aware of the problems. Recruiting foreign faculty and internationalising our campuses are important if we plan to enter the top 100… I think perception is the most difficult to change and we don’t know how to address it. Maybe we have to organise branding exercises.

Ritika Chopra: Why are not many IIT graduates pursuing PhD abroad?.
This is because of the availability of jobs. Now for a BTech or post-graduate student from IIT-Delhi, there are so many opportunities. They don’t look at the long term. The general perception is that you do a PhD if you want to become a professor, and that is not really true. Many high-tech industries recruit those with PhD but the salary package is not as high as offered to BTech students… But this is where the Prime Minister’s new research fellowship scheme comes into play. PhD candidates will be given Rs 75,000 a month. The fellowship programme is designed to attract BTech students to the PhD programme. Once they complete their PhD, we will try to recruit some of them as faculty. We set a target of 1,000 scholarships this year and Rs 2 lakh per year as contingency. This is almost equal to what an assistant professor gets paid in IIT. Although it’s an attractive scheme, we have been able to recruit only 130 people in the first round.

Ritika Chopra: Are you planning to rework the JEE Advanced format?.

The Bachelor’s programme is no longer our focus anymore. In established IITs, only 40 per cent of our students pursue Bachelor’s degree. The rest are Master’s and PhD students. You cannot get any points by admitting more students at the undergraduate level. The JEE exam is tough. By 1 or 2 marks, the rank can go down by thousands. However tough you may set the exam, at the end of the day, with the kind of preparation that students come with… it’s difficult to make it even tougher. If you make it any simpler, students will score full marks. The JEE exam is an example of supply and demand. The exam is designed to eliminate people or to reject candidates, not to select them. So it is tricky and complicated.
We need more institutions which will offer good Bachelor’s programmes. That’s the solution to the problem. The established IITs should now become research-focused universities. When you think of Stanford, you don’t think of its Bachelor’s programmes. You think of the research. That’s the aura of MIT and Stanford. Although we have more post-graduate students, all our focus happens to be on the undergraduate programme. So we are hoping that at some point of time, the NITs will become as good as the IITs and start offering undergraduate programmes as good as ours. Then IITs can focus more on research and start dealing with society’s problems.

Shradha Chettri: What is the student to teacher ratio in IIT-Delhi?

Currently the ratio is 1:18. You need at least 100 more faculty members to start scoring points in this parameter.

Ritika Chopra: When the government was pushing IITs to have non-residential students, it was resisted…

In South Delhi, we charge Rs 500 per month for hostels. But if you stay outside you need to pay at least Rs 8,000 per month. Many of our students cannot afford that. Starting next year, we are going to separate the accommodation process from the admission process.

Shubhajit Roy: If the IITs are good, why the need to improve perception?,

It is because the media reports these international rankings in a prominent manner. Eventually the government reacts to public pressure. We don’t care. We know that we are good. In terms of undergraduate courses, the IITs are better than the best in the world. But the world also needs to say we are good. The ranking agencies are all private players, they are trying to make money out of that process. And the more serious one becomes about these rankings, the better for them… Many of these ranking organisations also run businesses that help in improving perception.

Ravish Tiwari: The IITs lack appreciation for humanities and social science students. Is there any plan to correct this attitude?

In India, technology institutions have not been able to showcase a lot of the work that has benefited the society. The reason is the fragmented way education is run in this country. You want to do engineering, we created the IITs. You want to do medicine, we created the AIIMS. You want to study management, we created the IIMs. Take the example of doubling farmers’ income by 2022. This requires multiple disciplines to come together.

Somebody has to work on Census, some on understanding the social aspects of it, and some at improving technologies. But this coming together is difficult because of our fragmented education system. We need to make our universities more comprehensive. At IIT-Delhi, we have started a School of Public Policy. Scientists and researchers can work on technological problems and put together a policy document that can help the country.

Ravish Tiwari: Has there been any change in industry-academia ties?

It is changing but slowly. This year, we received sponsored research funding worth about Rs 500 crore. Only 10 per cent of the amount has been given by the industry. This is because industries are not looking at long term like disruptive technologies. When I do research, I find it easier to work with Intel in the US or Portland, than the Bengaluru branch. The kind of work Intel is doing in Bengaluru is not next-generation technology. Many industries in the country are out of sync with academia… Unless industries collaborate with us more closely, we will not see light of the day. Because much of our research starts in the library and ends in the library. We have got the problem from the library and after publishing it goes back to the library.

However, some industries are beginning to look at the long term. When Manohar Parrikar was the defence minister, he asked the Defence Research and Development Organisation (DRDO) to work with the IITs. In the US, a lot of research happens with defence funding. In India, the defence sector had their own DRDO laboratories. Parrikar asked them to collaborate with the IITs and create Joint Advanced Technology Centres. He allotted Rs 200-300 crore. Now defence people have started centres in the IITs in Delhi, Bombay, Madras, and Jadavpur University.

For the first time, we are looking at agricultural problems. The sector was handled by the Indian Council for Agricultural Research (ICAR). Now IIT faculty members have been asked to collaborate with the ICAR. Last week, we signed an MoU with the All India Institute of Ayurveda. Nobody knows what Bhasma, used in Ayurveda, contains. When we analysed it, we found it contains arsenic, sulphur, magnesium etc. These are metals harmful to the body. But Ayurveda seems to work. So if proper procedures are not followed while making Ayurvedic drugs, a lot of issues can arise.